Strachur Store Full

No 3 storeWe are always amazed and delighted at the generosity of people who collect and send goods to be transported to Malawi in our containers.  So far this year we have loaded and sent 5 x 40ft containers, each at a cost of around £11,000 and hope to send another, our first from our new Dundee depot, in December or January.

As you can imagine, the number we can send depends on funds available and on the work of a few people who spend many hours labelling, sorting, stacking and listing the boxes on a manifest before loading day – which involves around 30 volunteers.

At the moment our Strachur store is absolutely full and we cannot accept any more goods there in the meantime. Goods are still being accepted at our Dundee depot which, we hope, will be open every second Saturday (10 am until 12.30 pm) and Monday (3 – 7 pm)

Open Day at Dundee

Dundee depot

 

You are invited to come and see the storage and loading facilities  at our new Dundee Depot on Saturday 19th October between 10 am and 12.30 pm. You will be very welcome. Unfortunately, we cannot offer hospitality as yet, but you are welcome to bring your own coffee, tea and biscuits and to get involved with the work.

Dundee Depot – at last! Please note change of Monday opening!

Dundee depotOn Wednesday 9th October Sue will be in Dundee to pick up the keys of our new Dundee depot which will be at 11 Peddie Street, Dundee, DD1 5LB. Once she has had a chance to get the space organised she will be ready to take delivery of goods on:-

Saturday 19th October 10 am – 12.30 pm

Monday 21st October 3 – 7 pm

Saturday 2nd November 10 am – 12.30 pm

Monday 4th November 3 – 7 pm

It may be possible to arrange for deliveries at other times, but please be patient until we see how this is going to work and until a new “container team” are up and running. In the meantime, please email enquiries.

We are all very excited with this new development – one that has not been short of challenges but, with much prayer, it has at last come about.

Building bridges

zenda bridgeWhatever happened to all those huge pipes that were loaded into a container in March?

They arrived in Ekwendeni in July where they were stored until John arrived at the end of the month when they were loaded (manually) onto lorries and taken to Zenda – not a place that is well known in northern Malawi as it is a small village miles from anywhere.  Yet the road over a stream to the school is impassable in the wet season.  Hence no children go to school for 3 months of the year.

John is using the pipes in conjunction with bags of sand/cement mix and special membranes and with the help of the local people to build a culvert which will allow all-year-round access to Zenda.

Henga bridgeAs you can see from the pictures, the bridge is not yet finished but Ben, driving the Raven Trust vehicle, tested its strength. Finishing of the bridge has been hampered by unseasonable heavy rain but, by the time John comes home at the end of the month, it will be all finished and the people of Zenda will look forward to their first rainy season when they will not be cut off from local services.

Another bridge will be built at Henga to replace the present “bridge” across a deep gully.

This kind of work makes a tremendous difference to the lives of people in remote communities.

Have chair, will travel

mobile dental chairTwo dentists from Dunoon, Nigel and Vicky Milne, have just returned from their second visit to Malawi where they spent three very busy weeks. They were finishing off the installation of a new dental chair at Ekwendeni and setting up a dental unit at Embangweni where they met the newly employed dental therapist. In addition they saw 28 patients at the outreach clinic at Baula and travelled in the new Robert Laws boat with their mobile dental chair to hold a dental clinic at T’charo where the people have no access to dental care – a visit not lacking in challenge, since the clinic there has no electricity!

Also on their timetable was a visit to the primary school at Livingstonia where Flossie (the dental bear) taught the childern to use toothbrushes and Nigel and Vicky applied fluoride varnish to over 500 mouths to help prevent decay.